The Backyard Larder

A place to explore and buy perennial vegetables and other food plants.

Autumn in the Perennial Vegetable Garden 2013

Three months after their summer photos the perennial vegetables are mostly looking rather faded – with a few exceptions. Next month I hope to bring you photos of some below ground developments amongst the root crops.

Spring and summer photos and winter update. Second set of photos here.

Sea kale
Sea kale
Caucasian spinach
Caucasian spinach
Daubenton kale
Daubenton kale
Good King Henry
Good King Henry
Sorrel "Profusion"
Sorrel “Profusion”
Ostrich fern
Ostrich fern (no sign of wild garlic)
Sea beet
Sea beet
Daylily
Daylily
Babington leek
Babington leek
Giant chives
Giant chives
Turkish rocket
Turkish rocket
Buckler-leaved sorrel
Buckler-leaved sorrel
Pink purslane, musk mallow, hosta
Pink purslane, musk mallow, hosta
Skirret stalk
Skirret (just a stalk now)
Red-veined sorrel
Red-veined sorrel
Cicely
Cicely
Jerusalem artichoke
Jerusalem artichoke
Chinese artichoke
Chinese artichoke

 

4 comments on “Autumn in the Perennial Vegetable Garden 2013”

    I like to see photos of what other people have as it gives me a better idea of what to expect. We bought some Jerusalem Artichoke yesterday to eat just to check we like it, it'll be something I'll plant. Am interested in your Babinton Leek – what does that taste like? Is it just normal leak flavour?

    Reply

    Hi Andy,

    We haven't eaten much of the Babingtom leeks yet but I would say the leek shoots (cut at about 30cm tall) are like regular leeks but with a rather firmer, greener leaf and a mild garlic flavour. I'm really looking forward to trying leek and potato soup with them this winter.

    Reply

    Love your crops here. Another you could try are Salad Burnett (evergreen and winter hardy – leaves taste like cucumber)
    Am interested in your cicely – have some growing in my garden but do not have a clue what to do with it.

    Reply

    Thanks Marie. I do have salad burnet and will hope to photograph its seasonal progression next year with the other perennials which didn't get featured this year. Cicely is known for counteracting acidity in dishes (so is often recommended as a way to reduce the sugar in jams and puddings made with acid fruit). It combines well with the burnet in a salad along with a more bitter ingredient like chicory perhaps. (The seeds are popular in salads too.) It goes well in soups and omelettes also but more in typical herb quantities rather than as a vegetable. I haven't tried it but you could also sample the cooked root especially from younger plants. It is said to be rather like parsnip with an aniseed flavour.

    Reply

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